Indie Authors Answer Questions About Self-Publishing

Today, our 30 awesome indie authors answer these five questions:

4.      If you’ve been self-published for a while, what changes have you seen in the self-publishing industry?

5.      If you’ve been traditionally published, what moved you to become self-published?

6.      Simon and Schuster has jumped on the bandwagon with their self-publishing service called, Archways. Do you see self-publishing as the “wave of the future?” 

7.      Do you use a website and/or blog to market your book(s)? 

8.      What is your best tip for marketing self-published books?

1. Sherry Ficklin

 4.      If you’ve been self-published for a while, what changes have you seen in the self-publishing industry?

I think we are seeing a slow but noticeable shift in how self published books are received by readers. So often readers see a self published book as low quality, and often times rightly so. People get so excited at the idea of self publishing that they skimp on things like editing and professional cover design. It makes all self published books look bad. And let me tell you, its better not to be published at all then to have something out there that is anything less than perfect. Maybe it’s not fair, but to overcome the stigma of being self published, you book has to be not as good as other traditionally published books—it has to be better.

 5.       If you’ve been traditionally published, what moved you to become self-published?

 I really liked the idea of having all the control, especially over the cover, release dates, and marketing. Plus, not having to share a huge chunk of royalties with a company who, often, doesn’t really earn their share. I’ve been pretty fortunate, but I know a lot of people who handed in a manuscript and were rushed to press with no (or minimal) editing, crappy covers, and zero marketing. Basically they lost 70% of their royalties for someone to upload it to Amazon. That makes me butt hurt.

 6.       Simon and Schuster has jumped on the bandwagon with their self-publishing service called, Archways. Do you see self-publishing as the “wave of the future?”

 No. I think self publishing, at it’s very best, does two things. It gives authors a chance to prove their writing, ideas, or concepts are worthy of reading (which is often why they are passed over by big publishers and agents) and it forces publishing houses to look at authors and books they normally might not. As an example, Jennifer Armentrout wrote a book not long ago and shopped it as ‘New Adult’ genre. Well, if you’ve ever been to a book store, you know there is NO such shelf as ‘new adult’. It doesn’t exist. So they shot her down and she self published it. In a matter of weeks it was a NYT bestseller and she had a print offer in the high six figures. You bet your ass they are taking ‘new adult’ books now. For me, I was told that my YA Mystery was too contemporary for YA three years ago. But it got great reviews and eventually a bigger publisher took notice and scooped it up. I bet I will make WAY more sales with the publisher, because of the places they can get it and the ‘legitimacy’ their brand name carries.

 But at the end of the day, what a book needs to succeed 90% of the time (and not every time, there are obviously those mega hit self published anomalies. But the odds are very similar to winning powerball) is a publishing house with the capital to market it widely and get it in the hands of bulk buyers for major chain and indie bookstores.

 7.       Do you use a website and/or blog to market your book(s)? Please leave web addresses.

 I have my author website, www.sherryficklin.com, but we have a new site for my Lost Imperials series that is amazing. It’s really fun and interactive. Again, the product of having a team of brains and marketing people behind you. It’s over at www.thelostimperials.com

 8.       What is your best tip for marketing self-published books?

 Find your audience and learn how to engage them. EVERY target audience is different and you have to engage them in different ways. I sent my self published book to literally dozens of bloggers. I marketed it on social media, on military web shows (it’s about a military kid), and on bases near where I lived. Beyond that, the best thing you can do is just have a really well written, really well edited book.

http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=ntt_athr_dp_sr_1?ie=UTF8&field-author=Sherry+Ficklin&search-alias=books&text=Sherry+Ficklin&sort=relevancerank

2. Marsha Ward

4. If you’ve been self-published for a while, what changes have you seen in the self-publishing industry?

I have seen vast changes. With the advent of availability to the print services of Lightning Source, Inc., and the coming of BookSurge and CreateSpace, authors can print a few copies for hand sales, while putting their work into electronic form, which is where the BIG sales numbers come from, in my experience. Ebook distribution is now possible because of Smashwords.com and the Kindle Direct Publishing program. Others came along, and made it a big wide wonderful world for indie authors.

 5. If you’ve been traditionally published, what moved you to become self-published?

N/A

 6. Simon and Schuster has jumped on the bandwagon with their self-publishing service called, Archways. Do you see self-publishing as the “wave of the future?”

I do see self-publishing as the wave of the future, but certainly not through such scamming programs as Archways. Authors are much better remaining independent, contracting for such services as are needed, and putting their work into the available distribution channels. There is no need to pay mega-bucks to “providers” that partner through Author Solutions, Inc.

 7.  Do you use a website and/or blog to market your book(s)? Please leave web addresses.

I have a website at http://marshaward.com, another for my imprint at http://westwardbooks.com, and two blogs: “Writer in the Pines” at http://marshaward.blogspot.com/ and “The Characters in Marsha’s Head” at http://charactersinmarshashead.blogspot.com/.

 8.  What is your best tip for marketing self-published books?

I have two tips. Stay away from any “self-publishing assistance” program that partners with Author Solutions, Inc.; and for a college education in scaling the ropes of independent publishing, read the blog of author J A Konrath, “A Newbie’s Guide to Publishing” at http://jakonrath.blogspot.com/.

http://marshaward.blogspot.com/p/purchase.html

 3. Scott Blasingame

 4.       If you’ve been self-published for a while, what changes have you seen in the self-publishing industry?

Not sure I can really answer that. I consider myself to be a bit of a novice at this still.

5.       If you’ve been traditionally published, what moved you to become self-published?

I’ve never been traditionally published but the reason I self-published was on the behest of a book rep my sister knows through her work. I had written and mailed query letters to several publishers which resulted in rejections from all. I wanted to get the book out there and had been researching  about  ebook self-publication.  

 6.       Simon and Schuster has jumped on the bandwagon with their self-publishing service called, Archways. Do you see self-publishing as the “wave of the future?”

I think it already is.

7.       Do you use a website and/or blog to market your book(s)? Please leave web addresses.

No, I don’t.

8.       What is your best tip for marketing self-published books?

Good question. I’m interested to learn what you find out.

Createspace link: https://www.createspace.com/3674446

4. John Hartnett

4.        If you’ve been self-published for a while, what changes have you seen in the self-publishing industry?

I’ve not been in the self publishing world very long but it’s clear that there are many, many authors out there clamoring for the same readers through all the existing channels spanning Twitter, Facebook, blogs, email lists, third party marketing companies, blog tour hosting companies, etc.  Just like in the Gold Rush, where the suppliers, restaurants, hotels and service providers made most of the money from those who needed to be equipped, fed and housed while they searched for gold,  those who derive the greatest benefits from the self-publishing industry are those who provide services related to the editing, publication, promotion and marketing of author’s work.

5.        If you’ve been traditionally published, what moved you to become self-published?

Like the film industry, the threshold for risk among traditional publishers, continues to decline.  There are name authors, celebrities and other recognized, established opinion leaders and subject matter experts who can no longer attain the attention or support of traditional publishers who are focused more on the big hit blockbuster books and less on smaller niche markets.

Even if you do find a publisher willing to take your book, the time it takes to go to market is significantly longer than if you published the book independently.

I had no choice but to go my own way.

6.         Simon and Schuster has jumped on the bandwagon with their self-publishing service called, Archways. Do you see self-publishing as the “wave of the future?”

I don’t know.  Self publishing certainly appears to be here to stay but what remains unclear is how the market is able to separate the wheat from the chaff.    Keep in mind that with the Simon and Shuster service, they make their money upfront and regardless of whether a book is successful or not from a unit sales perspective.  That particular business model is here for the long haul as long as there are authors willing to spend for those services.  With the tools to publish more accessible and affordable, any one can write a book.  The question remains, should the book have been written in the first place and is there an audience for it.   Same conditions exist for video uploading and sharing sites such as YouTube.  Anyone can post a video, and often does, but what they’re posting often presents any real value from a content, information or entertainment perspective.

7.        Do you use a website and/or blog to market your book(s)? Please leave web addresses.

Since I write comedic material, I use my blog, “The Monkey Bellhop” to promote my book.  I try to post at least two to three times a week and all the material is original and I’d like to think well crafted from an entertainment perspective.  I also use Facebook for promoting my book with my personal page, book page and page dedicated to The Monkey Bellhop.

 My blog:  http://monkeybellhop.com/

The Monkey Bellhop Facebook Page: https://www.facebook.com/JohnHartnettBlog?ref=hl

My facebook page:  https://www.facebook.com/john.hartnett.397

Barber’s Conundrum Facebook Page:  https://www.facebook.com/JohnHartnettBook?ref=hl

8. What is your best tip for marketing self-published books?

Write something you honestly believe people will be of value to readers and  cultivate a network of  supporters who will promote your books, brand because they want to.

Earlybird Publishing:http://www.earlybirdpublishing.com/shop/catalog/browse?sessid=7pDW3O0IKnjvu1DPUfT778i4nWwgYGDY6DzzrONT55E0PpB8yIgurKElnsqYSpa2&shop_param=

Barnes and Noble: http://www.barnesandnoble.com/s/the-barber-s-conundrum?keyword=the+barber%27s+conundrum&store=allproducts

 iTunes: https://itunes.apple.com/us/book/barbers-conundrum-other-stories/id586680872?mt=11

Smashwords: https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/262661

Diesel :http://www.diesel-ebooks.com/item/SW00000262661/Hartnett-John-The-Barber-s-Conundrum-and-Other-Stories-Observations-on-Life-From-the-Cheap-Seats/1.html

Kobo: http://www.kobobooks.com/search/search.html?q=the+barber%27s+conundrum+and+other+stories

5. Jaleta Clegg

 4.  If you’ve been self-published for a while, what changes have you seen in the self-publishing industry?

I’ve been watching it for a while. It’s much more accessible than it used to be. With sites like Smashwords, Createspace, and Kindle Direct Publisher, it’s very easy to publish your work. It’s not so easy to make it look good, but then it never was unless you had the right tools and know-how. The distribution channels for self-published books have really opened up, but they still can’t compete on the same footing as traditional publishers. Some venues just aren’t available to self-pubbed authors.

 5.  If you’ve been traditionally published, what moved you to become self-published?

My publisher called me to tell me that my books were great, getting great reviews, but they were selling. It was purely a business decision for them to drop me. I’d already dipped my toe in the self-publishing world so I decided to plunge in head-first. It was the only decision that made sense to me.

6.  Simon and Schuster has jumped on the bandwagon with their self-publishing service called, Archways. Do you see self-publishing as the “wave of the future?”

It’s another avenue. I think we’ll see in publishing what we saw in the music industry during the ’90s when CDs and recording technology made it easy for groups to record and sell their own work without going through a record label. Indie artists sprang up everywhere and pretty much rule the music scene. It only took a good distribution method that was open to them to really make the industry take off. Technology has reached the point that publishing is accessible to pretty much anyone with a computer and some basic formatting skills. Amazon threw open the distribution doors. The public is growing more accepting of self-published work. The publishing landscape is changing rapidly.

Companies like Simon and Schuster are going to offer packages to authors wanting to self-publish, but that’s not new. Self-publishing companies have been around for decades. They’ll take your money and print whatever you send them.

 7.  Do you use a website and/or blog to market your book(s)? Please leave web addresses.

I blog on Mondays (interviews, book reviews, announcements, excerpts, and the occasional rant) and Thursdays (recipes) at The Far Edge of Normal. http://jaletaclegg.blogspot.com/

I’ve got a complete list of my publications at http://www.jaletac.com

My series has its own website at http//www.altairanempire.com

But web design is not my strong suit, and I know it. I’m still working on the webpage thing.

8.  What is your best tip for marketing self-published books?

Make friends with other authors and join groups, but whatever you do, be a real person. Don’t only post promo links for your books. Don’t blather endlessly about your great reviews. Discuss writing skills and ideas, get involved in group promotions, join twitter chats. Go to local conventions, if that makes sense for your genre. I write SF/F/horror. They have several conventions a year that aren’t too far away. It’s a great place to network and meet potential fans.

If you figure out how to reach readers online, let me know. I’m still working on that one.

http://www.jaletac.com and her science fiction adventure at http://www.altairanempire.com

 6. Rhonda Patton

4.       If you’ve been self-published for a while, what changes have you seen in the self-publishing industry?

I know there are a lot more self-publishing authors out there.

5.       If you’ve been traditionally published, what moved you to become self-published?

I haven’t.

6.       Simon and Schuster has jumped on the bandwagon with their self-publishing service called, Archways. Do you see self-publishing as the “wave of the future?”

Yes, I do. It is easier to do, but takes a lot more time marketing.

7.       Do you use a website and/or blog to market your book(s)? Please leave web addresses.

www.thecroak500.com

8.       What is your best tip for marketing self-published books?

I personally have used all the social media sites to market, go for the audience you are targeting, and keep pressing on.

http://www.amazon.com/Rhonda-Patton/e/B008QX4XO2.

7. CJ Glassberg

4. If you’ve been self-published for a while, what changes have you seen in the self-publishing industry?

I have seen more people going the self publishing route, than going the traditional route. Self-publishing has gotten easier to publish your work.

5. Simon and Schuster has jumped on the bandwagon with their self-publishing service called, Archways. Do you see self-publishing as the “wave of the future?”

I do see self-publishing as the wave of the future because, traditional publishing is getting harder to get your work accepted for publishing your work. Authors at traditional publishing houses make a lot less money in royalties on their books, than self-publishing. Self- published book authors make more money in royalties.

6. Do you use a website and/or blog to market your book(s)?Please leave web addresses.

I use Facebook fan page to market my books

 7. What is your best tip for marketing self-published books?

Katz: Amazon http://www.amazon.com/Katz-C-J-Glassberg/dp/1491230401/ref=tmm_pap_title_0?ie=UTF8&qid=1377843449&sr=1-3

8. Joseph Puente, Puente Media/Utah Filmmakers

4. If you’ve been self-published for a while, what changes have you seen in the self-publishing industry?

I’m not experienced enough to answer this question beyond saying that I both love and hate how easy it is to self-publish. Love it because I can say I’m published. Hate it because any schmuck can self-publish. 🙂

5. Simon and Schuster has jumped on the bandwagon with their self-publishing service called, Archways. Do you see self-publishing as the “wave of the future?”

I certainly see it as a viable option for people, especially where ebooks are involved.

6. Do you use a website and/or blog to market your book(s)? Please leave web addresses.

7. What is your best tip for marketing self-published books?

Be persistent about it.

http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/movie-ratings-mormonism-and-morality-joseph-puente/1115766924?ean=2940044585492

9. Michaelbrent Collings

4.    If you’ve been self-published for a while, what changes have you seen in the self-publishing industry?

It’s getting bigger, and more “legit.”  Not yet at MC Hammer levels (“too legit to quit”), but there’s a lot less stigma.  Especially since so many of the NY Times bestsellers each year are people who started out as self-pubs.  The fact that anyone can do it thanks to things like Kindle and CreateSpace makes it a very level playing field in a lot of ways.  Of course, that also comes with some downsides.  The gates are wide open: anyone can publish.  But just because you CAN doesn’t mean you SHOULD.  I think everyone has stories to tell, but not everyone has the motivation or interest to tell those stories well or professionally.  Taking the time to actually learn a craft is a very different thing than just learning enough to click the “upload” button and then watch in awe as literally no one buys your book.

5.    If you’ve been traditionally published, what moved you to become self-published?

Self-publishing, for me, is a way to a) quickly move my work to the public, b) in a way that is under my control.  I like setting my own pace, creating my own covers, doing all that stuff.  I have taken a lot of time learning how to do each phase of publishing, from writing to graphic design to layout to marketing.  That’s not for everyone, but I enjoy it.  And it’s paying off for me.  I’m consistently rated as one of Amazon’s Most Popular Horror Writers, all my books in the last year and half have hit at least one of Amazon’s major genre bestseller lists, and most of them have stayed there for a good long time.

6.    Simon and Schuster has jumped on the bandwagon with their self-publishing service called, Archways. Do you see self-publishing as the “wave of the future?”

Huh.  If a traditional publisher is doing some of the work, is it self-publishing?  Regardless, to call it the wave of the future is a bit misleading, I think.  I see it as being like radio, or television, or the internet.  Each was heralded as a game changer (it was) that would destroy the media that had gone before (it didn’t).  Rather, the new thing was a talking point for a while, then found its niche and settled down.  I don’t think self-pub (whether via print or epublishing) will ever be the only – or even the main – publishing force.  It’s going to grow for a while more, then get coopted effectively by the corporations.  Either that or Amazon and Apple will collide in an epic battle that will end in the complete destruction of the universe.  One way or another, self-pub is NOT going to eat up everything.  It’s just going to end up as part of a new market that shifts to adjusts to the changing face of technology.

7.    Do you use a website and/or blog to market your book(s)? Please leave web addresses.

I have a website (michaelbrentcollings.com), but most of the way I connect with fans is through my Facebook fanpage at http://facebook.com/MichaelbrentCollings and the rest seems to be just good word of mouth.  Thankfully, oodles of folks seem to be enjoying my work enough to hand it off to their friends.  Hooray for cult mentality!

8.    What is your best tip for marketing self-published books?
Write another book.  And make it better than the last one.

http://www.michaelbrentcollings.com.

10. Kurt Kammeyer

4.       If you’ve been self-published for a while, what changes have you seen in the self-publishing industry?

The rise of the Internet, Amazon, and Barnes & Noble, among others.

5.       If you’ve been traditionally published, what moved you to become self-published?

More control over the end-product; e-books are far simpler to create and sell.

6.       Simon and Schuster has jumped on the bandwagon with their self-publishing service called, Archways. Do you see self-publishing as the “wave of the future?” 

Yes

7.       Do you use a website and/or blog to market your book(s)? Please leave web addresses.

http://www.clanofthestone.blogspot.com/

http://clanofthestone.appspot.com/

https://www.facebook.com/pages/The-Clan-of-the-Stone/136169076413370

8.       What is your best tip for marketing self-published books? Make sure you have a great cover

The President Elect book 1  http://www.smashwords.com/books/view/69820

The President Elect book 2  http://www.smashwords.com/books/view/70074

The President Elect book 3  http://www.smashwords.com/books/view/70076

The Clan of Stone  http://www.smashwords.com/books/view/63699

The Defender of God  http://www.smashwords.com/books/view/81641

The Empress of Edom http://www.smashwords.com/books/view/104122

By Ailad’s Bootstraps http://www.smashwords.com/books/view/119608

Bath-time Anomalies http://www.smashwords.com/books/view/178918

The Last Stradivari http://www.smashwords.com/books/view/207872

The Rejuvenated http://www.smashwords.com/books/view/263701

A Collection of Sacred Hymns  http://www.smashwords.com/books/view/323072

As Lambs to His Fold (written by his mother, Virginia Maughan Kammeyer) http://www.smashwords.com/books/view/287163

11. George Snyder ~ Award Winning Crime Novelist

4.       If you’ve been self-published for a while, what changes have you seen in the self-publishing industry? 

EBooks have changed everything over the past ten years. It has given rise to thousands of small eBook electronic outfits who act like publishers, sometimes using POD, although many will not consider print, or if they do they won’t mention it on their site. Now, everybody who can put together a shopping list has a book out there. The competition has reached snarling level. But many are one-shot writers; they write one or two books and expect the bucks to roll in. You got to keep at it; the numbers put you out there, especially with eBooks. You need a following brought on by many books. Another thing, I chair a writer critique group in Long Beach. With a show of hands, only I and one other out of fifteen at the table even owned an electronic reader. The last three books I read were on my Kindle. It isn’t my favorite way to read a book. The best thing eBooks had going was they were cheap. Even that’s changing. Also, none of my four aunts or two of my brothers even owns a computer. They do read my print books, probably because I give them a free copy.     

5.       If you’ve been traditionally published, what moved you to become self-published? 

My last four books were published by electronic and POD publishers. I have a good relationship with the publisher of my last three books. The editing is good, and the distribution is the same all of them use. If I were to stay traditional, I’d look no farther. But here’s what I’m sick of reading. I’m sick of reading about these writers who self-publish and sell a thousand books a month—and now we have some self-published millionaires. Never mind the guy who reached the New York Bestseller list and it only cost him $31,000 out of pocket. That stuff isn’t even in my financial solar system. Too many are making good money and I’m into…me too. Probably the main reason I’m switching to—ahem—Independent Publishing resurrecting my old Seaweed Library publishing, is the bad deal those eBook producers hand out. In the old days, publisher reps/book sellers could in themselves make a best seller. They pressured book sellers to buy, arranged signings, pushed for the New York area which was the headquarters for all books. Publishers who had them on payroll could take 80% of the royalty because they were making the book sell. Those days have gone the way of the dial phone. And yet, these electronic flashes still think they deserve 80% print royalty and up to 60% eBook. It’s obscene. I have a good deal with my traditional publisher. We’re on a 50/50 split down the line. But I’m getting greedy. I want it all, or at least 70% of eBook sales. My publisher does an on-site review. He lets me buy POD from Create Space for his cost. It is unethical for a publisher to take profit from book sales to their own writers. They don’t agree but there it is. Most of those books are giveaways anyhow. The biggest bitch I have against my publisher is I don’t like their covers. And the writer has little input for covers. This new outfit, Self-Pub-Covers is terrific. I went through all their covers and picked out at least 20 I like. So, anyway, my new books coming down the line will be Kindle KDP, Seaweed Library, and we’ll see how that works. I’m also going to send along my early books that never made the eBook route.        

 6.       Simon and Schuster has jumped on the bandwagon with their self-publishing service called, Archways. Do you see self-publishing as the “wave of the future?”

Self-publishing is not only the future, it is the future here now. I haven’t checked into the Simon and Shuster scheme but just their name makes it sound fishy to me. Face it, kids, Amazon does or will own publishing. Their finger is on the pulse and despite grumbles from a few disgruntled they are making the right moves.

 7.       Do you use a website and/or blog to market your book(s)? Please leave web addresses.

See below.

 8.       What is your best tip for marketing self-published books?

Here is where everybody will shout about editing, the cover, format. But kids, what you need first is a damned good story worth reading. If the story is good enough, it’ll sell if it’s written in black crayon on a paper bag. Most stories aren’t that good.

freelancer66@earthlink.net

Facebook-Goodreads-Smashwords-Google

12.  Shirley Bahlmann

4.       If you’ve been self-published for a while, what changes have you seen in the self-publishing industry? 

I don’t really follow publishing trends anymore. They tend to confuse me, as each person seems to have their own opinions and sometimes they conflict.

5.       If you’ve been traditionally published, what moved you to become self-published? 

I didn’t find a publisher to accept a story that I really wanted told. I also had an “orphan” book… the third in a series after the publishers of the first two went out of business. Then I wrote books for people who wanted them self-published so they could control the cover image and distribution.

6.       Simon and Schuster has jumped on the bandwagon with their self-publishing service called, Archways. Do you see self-publishing as the “wave of the future?” 

No. I see self-publishing as something that’s been around for a while. I don’t see anything futuristic in it, except that people will still be publishing their own works in the future.

7.       Do you use a website and/or blog to market your book(s)? Please leave web addresses. 

Yes. http://shirleybahlmann.blogspot.com/ http://shirleybahlmann.weebly.com/

8.       What is your best tip for marketing self-published books? 

Public speaking, with books for sale afterward.

http://shirleybahlmann.weebly.com/books.htmlhttp://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss_1?url=search-alias%3Daps&field-keywords=shirley+bahlmann

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ShirleyBahlmannAuthor

13. Mike Thies

4.        If you’ve been self-published for a while, what changes have you seen in the self-publishing industry?

I haven’t.

5.       If you’ve been traditionally published, what moved you to become self-published?

N/A.

6.       Simon and Schuster has jumped on the bandwagon with their self-publishing service called, Archways. Do you see self-publishing as the “wave of the future?” 

Most definitely. I think the traditional market is doing it to themselves, honestly. Since they won’t take chances on people anymore (unless you’re a celebrity or known author) they are passing up good books just because of a no-name in the industry. Perfect example is the Robert Galbraith who had horrible sales until it was found out that it was a pen-name for J.K. Rowling and then, and only then, did the sales really take off.

7.       Do you use a website and/or blog to market your book(s)? Please leave web addresses.

8.       What is your best tip for marketing self-published books?

Engage your audience. You need to. Put in the time, be active with them and get your face known out there. Don’t spam them with links on twitter, or tell them to buy your book on facebook. Have confidence in your book, if you don’t you don’t have a good book.

www.facebook.com/guardianofthecore

www.guardianofthecore.com

14. Greg Lovvorn

4.        If you’ve been self-published for a while, what changes have you seen in the self-publishing industry?

I really haven’t been in books that long. My early work and still the majority of my work is as a ghost writer for articles. Still in my short time publishing I have noticed more of the big traditional Publishing Houses coming around to the idea of having their own self-publishing sites.

 5.         If you’ve been traditionally published, what moved you to become self-published?

 To be honest I never even tried to submit a book to a traditional publisher. Writing for magazines and web developers I deal with corporate editors enough. I write books for two basic reasons; 1) The love of writing, 2) To deliver the message I want to deliver the way I want to deliver it. I have some editor friends, who have much better grammar skills than I do, who help me out when I ask. Jacquelyn Roberts has been a huge help and dear friend on this journey.

6.       Simon and Schuster has jumped on the bandwagon with their self-publishing service called, Archways. Do you see self-publishing as the “wave of the future?”

 Yes and no, self-publishing has been around longer than people realize. I had a teacher who self-published, with some success, his own poetry back in the late seventies. It is just that now, with the internet and all of its marketing and access potential that indies are coming wider known.

 I feel that there will always be a place for the traditional publishing houses and for the independent (self) publisher. The traditional publisher are geared toward wide general audience work while niche writers like myself would have a hard time attracting the kind of audience numbers they want. I am better served by self-publishing and marketing to my own small audience.

 7.       Do you use a website and/or blog to market your book(s)? Please leave web addresses.

 I have a blog http://eatingmodern.blogspot.com/ but it isn’t for promoting my books it something I just enjoy, when I have time. My background is actually in environmental work and now I do a lot of writing on those subjects and food issues.

 The easiest way of following my work is following me on YCN, Triond and of course my Amazon Authors page.

 Between my writing books now and the ghost writing I do to pay the bills I haven’t written many articles under my own name the last two months.

 8.       What is your best tip for marketing self-published books?

 Niche, find your audience and serve your audience. There are literally hundreds of thousands of sites and groups out there dealing with any and every subject imaginable, both fiction and nonfiction. Find these groups and get active.

 I don’t mean just join and post promotions of your work but really take an interest and become a part of the community. You will get what you give.

15. D. Ogden Huff

4.       If you’ve been self-published for a while, what changes have you seen in the self-publishing industry?

 There are more resources and information available. Every day it gets easier.

 5.       If you’ve been traditionally published, what moved you to become self-published?

I haven’t been traditionally published, but a chapter meeting lesson on self-publishing convinced me to give it a try. I’ve never regretted that decision.

6.       Simon and Schuster has jumped on the bandwagon with their self-publishing service called, Archways. Do you see self-publishing as the “wave of the future?”

Self-publishing is here to stay, but as more and more authors jump on the self-publishing bandwagon, the “supply” of books will go up. Laws of Economics dictate that when there is a high supply and demand doesn’t change, the price of books will be lower. Luckily, the profit margin to the self-published author is higher than to a traditionally published author so a lower price per book is acceptable. However, if the number of e-books continues to increase, it will make it more difficult to stand out in the crowd and get a share of the market.

Like the 1850’s Gold Rush, where the only people making money were the people selling stuff to the prospectors, in the 21st Century Book Rush, the only people making money may be a few authors who break-out from the crowd and those people selling products and services to the self-published authors. For the future, the only sure thing in publishing will be change.

 7.       Do you use a website and/or blog to market your book(s)? Please leave web addresses.

 My website is www.dogdenhuff.com . Check it out!

 8.       What is your best tip for marketing self-published books?

 I loved Lisa Mangum’s advice at the 2012 ANWA Writers Conference. She decided to do one marketing activity per week. That might include anything from blogging to facebooking to speaking. At the time, I thought I could do that—and I fully intend to. Once my life slows down.

16. Saoirse O’Mara

4.       If you’ve been self-published for a while, what changes have you seen in the self-publishing industry?

I’m noticing the self-publishing scene growing stronger in Germany. When I published Miro in 2011, I knew of hardly any self-publishers in Germany, and they were looked down on. Nowadays, there’s less contempt (even though there’s still more than a fair share) since more writers are taking this option into account.

In America, the “Big 6” seem to lose their grip on the publishing industry. Most news I heard about them recently has been bad news (joining up with vanity presses, getting warned about their contract terms by writers associations). There are more success stories coming from the self-published authors, and more of them are offered publishing contracts by mid-list to big publishing houses. Self-publishing is quickly losing it’s stigma.

 5.       If you’ve been traditionally published, what moved you to become self-published?

I haven’t been traditionally published yet, although one of my books has been picked up by a small German publisher for a bilingual edition (Miro), which will be published in addition to my self-published editions.

 6.       Simon and Schuster has jumped on the bandwagon with their self-publishing service called, Archways. Do you see self-publishing as the “wave of the future?”

I’m not absolutely sure since it’s been a while since I last read about them, but isn’t Archway one of the vanity presses? I wouldn’t call that self-publishing because for me, self-publishing means to “do it on my own”, hire my own professional help if needed, bear the risk and keep all the control. Those vanity presses only take a lot of money, make big promises, and you give up your rights to them.

 7.       Do you use a website and/or blog to market your book(s)? Please leave web addresses.

I at least try although I think my biggest marketing tool so far has been Facebook. My website is http://saoirseomara.wordpress.com. The A Rogue’s Tale website is http://aroguestale.wordpress.com, and Miro’s own website is http://mirodrakonia.wordpress.com.

 8.       What is your best tip for marketing self-published books?

Always carry bookmarks with you. And engage in your readers’ communities (online and offline). Only post links and promo materials where it’s allowed, help out others, give something back.

Theresa Berg http://www.amazon.com/Theresa-Berg/e/B0088MWM58/ref=sr_tc_2_0?qid=1377544573&sr=1-2-ent

17. Cindy Christiansen

4.        If you’ve been self-published for a while, what changes have you seen in the self-publishing industry?

I haven’t been self-pubbed long, but it hasn’t taken much time to see major issues and changes in the writing industry.  Self-publishing has had a huge impact—some good, some bad.

5.        If you’ve been traditionally published, what moved you to become self-published?

It gives me another avenue of promoting my work.  My goal is to introduce my work to new readers.  Offering my novellas at a lower price to draw them in to read my full-length books is just another way of doing that.

6.        Simon and Schuster has jumped on the bandwagon with their self-publishing service called, Archways. Do you see self-publishing as the “wave of the future?”

I think it’s the “hot ticket” right now.  It’s lead to some very poorly written work being published, low prices of which authors who are trying to make a living can’t compete, the fall of traditional publishing houses, authors cyber-bullying, and even unregulated written porn available to young tweens. I’m not saying I’m against it, but I think there will probably be further regulations as more and more issues arise.

7.        Do you use a website and/or blog to market your book(s)? Please leave web addresses.

An author needs a website and a blog to promote themselves. When readers first here about you, they look directly for your website.  It better be there.  But, that’s AFTER they have heard about you.  Blogs help draw in readers but social sites are your best bet.

8.        What is your best tip for marketing self-published books?

Promote yourself and your books on social sites, make sure you have your profile on Amazon completed and linked, and ask for Amazon reviews.  Most of what I make, by my publisher or self-pubbed, is made through Amazon.

Google+:  http://bit.ly/14TuIh6

Youtube home: bit.ly/Wtw4b8

cindy@dragonflyromance.com

Sweet Cravings Publishing: http://bit.ly/WdkOU0

Barnes and Noble: http://bit.ly/VmNLee

All Romance ebooks: http://bit.ly/1186k6h

Smashwords: http://bit.ly/19kmbY9

18. Jerry Hatchett

4.       If you’ve been self-published for a while, what changes have you seen in the self-publishing industry?

I joined the indie author ranks after the e-publishing revolution was well underway.

5.       If you’ve been traditionally published, what moved you to become self-published?

 Although I’m well published as a writer of non-fiction technology articles in magazines, my fiction was not traditionally published.

6.       Simon and Schuster has jumped on the bandwagon with their self-publishing service called, Archways. Do you see self-publishing as the “wave of the future?”

 I think the industry will continue to evolve and settle into a comfort zone that includes both self-publishing as well as the traditional approach. When it comes to physical books, both hardcover and mass-market paperback, traditional publishing will probably continue to be the most realistic way to reach the masses, simply due to an economy of scale. I think self-publishing will continue to play a huge role in the e-market.

7.       Do you use a website and/or blog to market your book(s)? Please leave web addresses.

 I have an author website at www.jerryhatchett.com and a blog called StoryFreak at jerryhatchett.blogspot.com that I use to promote myself as an author in general. I promote my books specifically on my website, but primarily use the blog to entertain, although I do post certain book-specific news about my books on the blog from time to time. Pawnbroker also has its own website at www.pawnbrokernovel.com.

 8.       What is your best tip for marketing self-published books?

 First and foremost, there should be no difference in how your books are written, edited, polished, and proofed, whether you’re submitting to traditional publishing or publishing it yourself. If there is a difference, self-published books should be even more stringently refined because while you could always submit to different traditional publishing channels and perhaps overcome an earlier weak effort, readers themselves may not be as forgiving. No matter where you’re marketing your work, it shouldn’t be marketed unless it’s of true professional quality. To wrap up my thoughts on this question:  My best tip is simply to write a great book.

 Author Website:  http://www.jerryhatchett.com

 StoryFreak Blog:  http://jerryhatchett.blogspot.com

 Pawnbroker Website:  http://www.pawnbrokernovel.com

 Public Email:  newsletter@jerryhatchett.com

 Newsletter Subscribe:  Jerry Hatchett Author Newsletter

 Pawnbroker on Amazon:  http://amzn.to/10GTdgU

 Seven Unholy Days on Amazon:  http://amzn.to/10tDIVN

 The Projectionist:  Part 1 on Amazon:  http://amzn.to/13gZrDe

 19. Donna Fernstrom

4.       If you’ve been self-published for a while, what changes have you seen in the self-publishing industry?

It’s gotten much easier, and there are more options.  Self-published books are also becoming increasingly accepted by the public, and are rising onto the Bestseller lists. I believe POD companies could still do better, but the growing competition is great for us writers.

 5. N/A

6.       Simon and Schuster has jumped on the bandwagon with their self-publishing service called, Archways. Do you see self-publishing as the “wave of the future?”

I went to that site, and saw ‘Author Solutions’ is involved.  Author Solutions is the notorious vanity press/predator that takes advantage of writers by emptying their wallets, instead of filling them.  I do see self-publishing as the wave of the future, but not THAT kind. 😀  Tomorrow’s self-publishing writers will need to be smart, and do their research, to avoid predators like Archways and Author Solutions.

7.       Do you use a website and/or blog to market your book(s)? Please leave web addresses.

My official author website is at http://www.DonnaFernstrom.com .  I do not have a blog, but I do have several facebook fan pages for my works.  Author page:  https://www.facebook.com/DonnaFernstrom  Worldwalkers Universe series page:  https://www.facebook.com/WorldwalkersUniverse  Tales Of Varg page:  https://www.facebook.com/TalesOfVarg  Book page for Sorrows:  https://www.facebook.com/pages/Sorrows/235072509974390  Book Page for Beginning Psionics: https://www.facebook.com/pages/Beginning-Psionics-A-Psionics-Training-Manual/592511570801789  Book Page for An Energy-Workers’ Guide To Real Vampirism:  https://www.facebook.com/pages/An-Energy-Workers-Guide-To-Real-Vampirism/398551750246588?

8.       What is your best tip for marketing self-published books?

I am NEW to marketing books.  My non-fiction books were easily marketed to my metaphysical business customers and those who know me within that community (on forums, etc).  Fiction is a completely different animal.  My best tip is, reviews are golden… and they’re VERY HARD TO GET.  Offer incentives for reviews.  Also, target your marketing to people who read your genre.  Scattering it everywhere is okay, but finding people who are actively looking for what you have is perfect.

http://www.donnafernstrom.com

http://www.amazon.com/Beginning-Psionics-Training-Manual-ebook/dp/B00AZNODS2

http://www.lulu.com/shop/winged-wolf/beginning-psionics-a-psionics-training-manual/ebook/product-20710921.html

http://www.lulu.com/shop/winged-wolf/beginning-psionics-a-psionics-training-manual/ebook/product-20710953.html .

http://www.lulu.com/shop/winged-wolf/beginning-psionics-a-psionics-training-manual/paperback/product-367887.html

http://www.amazon.com/Sorrows-Rogue-Saga-Donna-Fernstrom/dp/1490985336/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1377276119&sr=1-1

http://www.amazon.com/Sorrows-The-Rogue-Saga-ebook/dp/B00EOAL380/ref=sr_1_3?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1377276119&sr=1-3 .

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/349404

http://www.lulu.com/shop/donna-fernstrom/sorrows-pdf/ebook/product-21156643.html

http://www.writersout.com/node/9949 .

20. Lauren Ritz

4.       If you’ve been self-published for a while, what changes have you seen in the self-publishing industry?

N/A

5.       If you’ve been traditionally published, what moved you to become self-published?

N/A

 6.       Simon and Schuster has jumped on the bandwagon with their self-publishing service called, Archways. Do you see self-publishing as the “wave of the future?”

Self-publishing is here to stay. If the traditional publishers can be flexible, they won’t go away. If they’re not flexible, they’ll vanish and self-publishing will be the only way left.

7.       Do you use a website and/or blog to market your book(s)? Please leave web addresses.

My website (laurentritz.com) is undergoing major revisions so it’s not available at the moment. I have several blogs, but they’re not designed to market a particular book. My “readers” blog is halfworldinfo.blogspot.com. I have a facebook page, and I’m also on Wattpad and LinkedIn.

8.       What is your best tip for marketing self-published books?

Keep writing. Having one book out there isn’t enough–when people like what they read, they want more RIGHT NOW, so you want more than one item out there.

Kindle: Without A Voice

All other formats: Without A Voice

Kindle: Spirit

Nook: Spirit

All other formats: Spirit

21. Marie Higgins

4.       If you’ve been self-published for a while, what changes have you seen in the self-publishing industry?

I’ve only been published for a little over a year, but I have seen more and more authors joining the self-publishing ranks.

 5.       If you’ve been traditionally published, what moved you to become self-published?

Mainly sales.  When my publisher wasn’t showing me the moneyI decided to try self-publishing just to see if I could get more sales. Once I started making more than my publisher was giving me, I knew I was doing the right thing. Then I realized how much I loved the freedom. I got to choose my own book covers. I got to write the story the way I wanted (instead of having the editor practically rewrite the story for me), and I was able to watch my sales and calculate on a monthly basis how much I was making. Ahhh…HEAVEN!!!

 6.       Simon and Schuster has jumped on the bandwagon with their self-publishing service called, Archways. Do you see self-publishing as the “wave of the future?”

It must be since all of the bigger publishers are joining the self-publishing industry. But I really hope it’s the wave of the future because I’m not going to be very happy if I have to start looking for a publishing company again. L

 7.       Do you use a website and/or blog to market your book(s)? Please leave web addresses.

I have a blog/website (they are together). http://mariehiggins84302.blogspot.com  I also market my books on Facebook & Twitter.

 8.       What is your best tip for marketing self-published books?

From what I’ve seen, the best tip that I could give is that an author publish a lot of books within a month or two of each other. If the author only has a couple of books and they won’t be able to write another one for another year, then that is going to make it harder to create a reader base. I think that is why my books picked up so well, because I was publishing them so fast . (19 in a little over a year…)

22. Heather Jensen

4.       If you’ve been self-published for a while, what changes have you seen in the self-publishing industry?

When I first self-published everything was still paperback and hardback books because e-readers hadn’t been invented yet. That makes me sound so old, but I was so happy just to have a paperback copy of my first novel in my hands. Now, the e-books are where the money is at. There also weren’t too many options for self-published authors back then. You certainly couldn’t just upload your book to Amazon and let people purchase it. Authors have a lot more control over their books and so many more options when it comes to marketing now.

 5.       If you’ve been traditionally published, what moved you to become self-published?

I was never traditionally published. I chose to self-publish from the beginning because I have to have complete control over every aspect of the finished product.

 6.       Simon and Schuster has jumped on the bandwagon with their self-publishing service called, Archways. Do you see self-publishing as the “wave of the future?”

I really do. I’m sure there will always be a place for the Big 6 publishing companies, but self-publishing is so readily available that I think it will just keep growing. Social networking has really done wonders for authors who are willing to spend the time creating relationships online, as well.

 7.       Do you use a website and/or blog to market your book(s)? Please leave web addresses.

You can visit my author site at www.heatherjensen.info and my Facebook page at www.facebook.com/BloodandGuitars .

8.       What is your best tip for marketing self-published books?

Make sure that your manuscript is polished and edited by someone who has experience before you release it into the world. You want the stories to be the very best they can be before you turn them loose.

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00529IDZS

http://www.amazon.com/Blood-Guitars-Heather-Jensen/dp/1463511884

http://www.amazon.com/Immortals-Melodies-Blood-Guitars-ebook/dp/B0086GMMAQ

Author Website www.heatherjensen.info

Facebook www.facebook.com/BloodAndGuitars

Twitter https://twitter.com/#!/theedgeofwords

Google+ https://plus.google.com/u/0/b/112920558824411082148/

http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL6188671C464951F2&feature=plcp

http://www.goodreads.com/author/show/2870615.Heather_Jensen

23. Ia Uaro

4.       If you’ve been self-published for a while, what changes have you seen in the self-publishing industry?

I see desperate authors compromising their ideals to achieve sales (literary bloggers may have 2,000 followers, while erotica bloggers easily have 30,000 followers; and book sales follow this pattern).

I see new companies offering sophisticated hassle-free conversion to digital versions and easily arrange for distribution channels.

I see more companies taking advantage of inexperienced new authors.

 5.       If you’ve been traditionally published, what moved you to become self-published?

Sydney’s Song went against traditional recipes. I wasn’t prepared to alter this work into a mainstream book-after-the-publishers’-hearts.

6.       Simon and Schuster has jumped on the bandwagon with their self-publishing service called, Archways. Do you see self-publishing as the “wave of the future?”

Over 10,000 new self-published books every week is a gold-mine to supporting companies from editing services, typesetting, publishing, publicity and all the steps to distribution and marketing. Amazon alone reaps millions of dollars from newbies collectively on a regular basis, while it only reaps millions of dollars occasionally from famous authors. Other companies quickly follow suit. Simon and Shuster isn’t the only one. Penguin alone owns four major companies (such as Xlibris) under Author Solutions to reap money from self-publishers. But they do deliver.

You can pay them if you can afford to pay; but you can learn new skills and do everything yourself so you can save your money for advertising. I almost finish writing New Authors’ Pathfinder, a step-by step guide towards quality self publishing for those who want to do the works themselves.

 7.       Do you use a website and/or blog to market your book(s)? Please leave web addresses.

You MUST have a website, and it should be a professional one. The cheapest good-looking website can be developed from a blog (such as WordPress) at no cost or minimum cost (you only have to pay if you choose a dot-com name).

Or you can shop around for the best web builder. My sister built my website http://sydneyssong.net/ according to my design. Your website should showcase your author brand—I elaborate about this in my upcoming New Authors’ Pathfinder.

 8.       What is your best tip for marketing self-published books?

There’s no best tip. There are a hundred ways and several don’ts. You MUST do what’s effective and within your capacity, as much as you’re comfortable with. Get up—you have to run while chasing a dream. These are just a few things of what you can do:

·         Set up your identity properly from the start:  define your author brand, build your brand foundation, expand your brand awareness, take care of your name, book title, website’s name, website and blog design, interior design and cover art.

·         Learn (this is not difficult) about SEO and keywords, how to use keywords to optimize your website, blog, and YouTube channel. If you don’t learn about author branding and SEO, you will be wasting a large portion of your marketing effort and marketing fund.

·         Pitch with book trailer because YouTube has become important. Learn how to make your own trailer, know where to embed your SEO keywords on YouTube.

·         Book launch: plan your press release, contact media and book bloggers, hold release events on Goodreads, Facebook, and in real life.

·         Advertise online where other authors have found successes.

·         Submit your book into all promotional events, free online listings, book fairs, book contests.

·         Get involved in literary forums, writers’ festivals, community activities. Help others.

·         Review books by other authors and interview them. Their audience will check you out. This indirect publicity will broaden your market, because none of the other authors will have the same background as you. Through blog hosting, new people will discover you.

·         Write more books.

Ia Uaro’s website and shopYouTube channel, and blog.

 24. Amanda Holden

 4.       If you’ve been self-published for a while, what changes have you seen in the self-publishing industry?

I see that you are more in control of your book. You can purchase copies at a reasonable rate. I do not think it is high quality, but kids will read it and that’s what matters.

 5.       If you’ve been traditionally published, what moved you to become self-published?

N/A

6.       Simon and Schuster has jumped on the bandwagon with their self-publishing service called, Archways. Do you see self-publishing as the “wave of the future?”  .

Yes, I do in way. With self-publishing, you have to do everything pretty much by yourself and pay for advertising and what not. I think people are more willing to do that than to receive small royalties for their own book.

 7.       Do you use a website and/or blog to market your book(s)? Please leave web addresses.

I use a website. I am not too much into blogging, but I know it’s one way I can advertise.

 8.       What is your best tip for marketing self-published books?

Make a book trailer to get people excited about your book. Advertise all over Facebook and Twitter. Do these things before you release your work! You can also set up readings at your local libraries or a book signing.  Don’t give up!

Book Trailer: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OkmwYHMAIbg

25. Merita King

4.         If you’ve been self-published for a while, what changes have you seen in the self-publishing industry?

 Well, I’ve only been self published since June 2011 so I guess I haven’t been around long enough to notice any real evolution.  As me again in five years.

 5.         If you’ve been traditionally published, what moved you to become self-published?

6.         Simon and Schuster has jumped on the bandwagon with their self-publishing service called, Archways. Do you see self-publishing as the “wave of the future?”

I think it already is that and we are seeing things happen, like Simon and Shuster for instance, that indicate the big guys in the traditional publishing industry are trying to keep their finger on the button.  Lulu, the POD publishing platform, have recently gone in with the same self publishing company as Simon and Shuster, so it shows that people in power are taking self publishing seriously.

7.          Do you use a website and/or blog to market your book(s)? Please leave web addresses.

 Yes I do have a website and blog.  The link is http://www.meritaking.com

8.         What is your best tip for marketing self-published books?

 I’m probably the last person to ask for marketing advice, I’m terrible at it.  I think my best advice would be to save up and pay someone to do it for you.  Sounds crass I know, but for those of us who suck at marketing, it’s the best option if you have the money.  For those of us who don’t have the money, then what’s left is blog/facebook/twitter/ etc, lather, rinse, repeat.  It’s a thankless task and there are so many others doing the same things, that many authors have resorted to bribery and fraud to get noticed.  Many authors are holding events where they offer money and/or goods in return for your purchase of their book and it’s just a lottery at the end of the day.  Only one person gets the amazon gift card/bracelet/box of chocs etc whilst the rest of you are stuck with the book you paid out good money for.  Others are rigging their genre listings so they can get higher up the rankings and look like a bestseller and there are a few who have simply stolen titles of well known books from very famous authors or famous movies.  One author I saw on facebook, stole the title of her book from Edgar Allen Poe and even the story was identical.  A few have named their characters after very famous movie/book characters that we already know.  All of this and more besides, goes on these days in the race to get our stuff out there.  My advice for marketing?  Don’t do any of that shit.  Write a good story, edit it well, get a decent cover for it, blog about it, use twitter and fb and keep your day job.

The Lilean Chronicles: Book One ~ Redemption  http://www.amazon.com/The-Lilean-Chronicles-Redemption-ebook/dp/B0088Q0YM2/ref=sr_1_1?s=digital-text&ie=UTF8&qid=1377886631&sr=1-1&keywords=merita+king

The Lilean Chronicles: Book Two ~ The Sleeping  http://www.amazon.com/The-Lilean-Chronicles-Sleeping-ebook/dp/B009DNXEEY/ref=sr_1_12?s=digital-text&ie=UTF8&qid=1377886687&sr=1-12&keywords=merita+king

The Lilean Chronicles: Book Three ~ Changing Faces  http://www.amazon.com/The-Lilean-Chronicles-Changing-ebook/dp/B009D76DRK/ref=sr_1_11?s=digital-text&ie=UTF8&qid=1377886728&sr=1-11&keywords=merita+king

The Lilean Chronicles: Book Four ~ Avalanche Effect  http://www.amazon.com/The-Lilean-Chronicles-Avalanche-ebook/dp/B00AFVBOIG/ref=sr_1_9?s=digital-text&ie=UTF8&qid=1377886770&sr=1-9&keywords=merita+king

Floxham Island ~ Sinclair V-Log AZ267/M  http://www.amazon.com/Floxham-Island-Sinclair-V-Log-ebook/dp/B00BAS5C04/ref=sr_1_8?s=digital-text&ie=UTF8&qid=1377886821&sr=1-8&keywords=merita+king

Acts of Life  http://www.amazon.com/Acts-of-Life-ebook/dp/B00DB4E83M/ref=sr_1_2?s=digital-text&ie=UTF8&qid=1377886850&sr=1-2&keywords=merita+king

 26. Janiera Eldridge

4.       If you’ve been self-published for a while, what changes have you seen in the self-publishing industry?

In the past year alone there has been a huge influx in people self-publishing. Sometimes I think that’s a good thing and sometimes I think it’s bad.

5.       If you’ve been traditionally published, what moved you to become self-published?

I tried being traditionally published, the company turned out to be a huge scam. I would never consider traditional publishing unless it was with a big 6 company. Too many independent publishers are springing up that are either not legit or don’t know what they’re doing. So, me personally, I’ll never go down t that road again.

6.       Simon and Schuster has jumped on the bandwagon with their self-publishing service called, Archways. Do you see self-publishing as the “wave of the future?”

That wave is already here and so far it’s pretty awesome!

7.       Do you use a website and/or blog to market your book(s)? Please leave web addresses.

I do. I post book reviews of other books and behind the scenes features of my books on my blog Beauty, Books and Bodacious Deals.

8.       What is your best tip for marketing self-published books?

Be yourself in whatever marketing choice you choose. People are more likely to buy your books if they feel as if they know you or can relate to you on a personal level.

27. Heather McCoubrey

4.         If you’ve been traditionally published, what moved you to become self published?

I tried the traditional route, and after many, many, many rejections I got really frustrated with the system. So often I think the traditional route is stifled. Most agents don’t really want to work with unknown authors, and most of the publishing houses won’t take a chance on an unagented author. I also feel that agents/publishers/editors try to make every author the same going based on what’s currently selling and/or popular. I had people telling me my story is good, excellent, amazing and yet I was constantly being rejected. So, I embraced the Indie life and self published. I’m pleased with the results so far.

6.         Simon and Schuster has jumped on the bandwagon with their self publishing service called, Archways. Do you see self publishing as the “wave of the future?”

Absolutely. I’m not going to lie and say everyone who self publishes has the best product. They don’t. I’m a huge fan of Indie books and I try to read as many as I can. You can definitely tell the difference between an Indie author who made sure to cross all the T’s and dot all the I’s and one who didn’t. Unfortunately, in my opinion, the only way to fix that is to ensure they go through an editor first. But then I think you’d start running into the close-minded, interfering issues that traditional publishing brings. It’s kind of a rock and a hard place. But that all being said, I think self publishing is great. It gives wonderful new authors a real chance at getting their products out there for the world to see. And with print-on-demand, it’s kind of a no-brainer.

7.         Do you use a website and/or blog to market your book(s)? Please leave web addresses.

I have a website, but I don’t do much marketing on it. I write a blog and post my short story submissions. I do have links to my novel and a listing of my worksinprogress.

8.         What is your best tip for marketing self published books?

RESEARCH. As I stated above, I’m totally winging this. Since I published in March, I have learned so much about marketing. I’m not where I’d like to be, but I’m a whole lot farther than I was.

Website: http://heathermccoubrey.com

Twitter: @h_mccoubrey

Amazon: http://www.amazon.com/ToLoveTwiceebook/dp/B00BWYEHH0/

B&N Nook: http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/tolovetwiceheathermccoubrey/

1116093917?ean=2940148741381

28. Christy Dorrity

4.       If you’ve been self-published for a while, what changes have you seen in the self-publishing industry?

The attitude toward Indie authors is slowly changing. I used to feel embarrassed when I told people that I was self-published, but now I say it with pride.

 5.       If you’ve been traditionally published, what moved you to become self-published?

I made the decision to self-publish from the beginning.

 6.       Simon and Schuster has jumped on the bandwagon with their self-publishing service called, Archways. Do you see self-publishing as the “wave of the future?”

I don’t think there is any one right pathway for authors. Each story has it’s own journey, and each person has to decide what they want out of their career. I do think we will continue to see some amazing changes in the years ahead.

 7.       Do you use a website and/or blog to market your book(s)? Please leave web addresses.

My author website is www.christydorrity.com, where I blog about writing, books, and Irish dance. Information about my books, and my husband’s artwork can be found on www.mythicstudios.biz.

 8.       What is your best tip for marketing self-published books?

Get out of your shell and meet people. Don’t be afraid to ask others for help. Network and get involved in communities, online and in the real world.

christydorrity@yahoo.com

 29. Jennifer Raygoza

4.       If you’ve been self-published for a while, what changes have you seen in the self-publishing industry?

I am a new comer so it doesn’t apply, but what I am seeing is a huge movement happening. Traditional publishing should be a little concerned.

 5.       If you’ve been traditionally published, what moved you to become self-published?

Doesn’t apply.

 6.       Simon and Schuster has jumped on the bandwagon with their self-publishing service called, Archways. Do you see self-publishing as the “wave of the future?”

It’s here already. The movement is huge and making waves as we speak.

 7.       Do you use a website and/or blog to market your book(s)? Please leave web addresses.

http://theguardiansvampnovel.webs.com/

 8.       What is your best tip for marketing self-published books?

Connecting with your fans through Social Media.

  Purchase Link http://amzn.com/B00C13CKVG

Website- http://theguardiansvampnovel.webs.com/

Facebook-https://www.facebook.com/theguardiansvampnovel

30. Anna del C. Dye

4.       If you’ve been self-published for a while, what changes have you seen in the self-publishing industry?

Mostly in people’s view of it. I know a few editors of publishing companies who swear they will never touch an author who has gone indie. That is not open-minded and the self-publishing era will leave them behind pretty soon. Self-publishing is at the fingertips of everyone now. (A double-edged knife)

 5.       If you’ve been traditionally published, what moved you to become self-published?

N/A

6.       Simon and Schuster has jumped on the bandwagon with their self-publishing service called, Archways. Do you see self-publishing as the “wave of the future?”

Absolutely. As I said, if the traditional publishing companies don’t get in the self-publishing wagon they will fall behind. They can’t stay in the past or they will shrivel and die.  There is no money in that.

 7.       Do you use a website and/or blog to market your book(s)? Please leave web addresses.

Yes, I had a hard time to start with but now I am getting the hang of it. I just learned how to add pictures to my blog posts. My husband made and manages my website.

I do book reviews every Tuesday and authors’ interviews on Saturdays. I participate in blog tours and blog hops. This is easier than trying to come up with time to do articles and such. Articles need to be edited before they go public. I also have a program that lets me do my blogs in advance and publish them automatically.

 8.       What is your best tip for marketing self-published books?

Do a blog tour and a Goodreads give away on the week your book comes out. This takes time to organize, but if you have helped other authors before, they should and many are willing to help you back. You want to get a bunch of readers or reviewers to be part of the tour too. They are the ones who have readers who follow them. The more followers they have, the better exposure for you.

http://www.annadelc.com/blog

 Join us next time when our indie authors answer these last six questions:
9.         Let’s talk money. How much more profitable has self-publishing been for you than traditional publishing? If you’ve never been traditionally published, have you found self-publishing to be worthwhile? Please give examples.

10.        Do you support your family with your self-published earnings?

11.       What has been the most difficult part of self-publishing for you?

12.       What has been the most exciting or rewarding part of self-publishing for you?

13.       There has been a stigma on self-published books making them seem of a lesser value than those traditionally published. Why do you believe this is so? With the advent of e-books and the saturation of easy-to-self-publish books, do you find this still to be true?

14.      What question have I not asked that you’d like to pose and then respond to?

 

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2 Responses to Indie Authors Answer Questions About Self-Publishing

  1. This is a great post, Theresa. I hope everyone is benefiting from this answers. Thanks for the post. 🙂

  2. Jaleta Clegg says:

    I need to sell more books so I can afford to replace my sticky keyboard. Argh. My publisher broke up with me because my books *weren’t* selling despite good reviews. But I’m not sorry about it. I’ve got two more books in the series out. I’ve also got rights back on book one so I can fix the cover that has bugged me since it first came out. Being self-published is a lot of work, but the control is nice. If I hate the cover, I can only blame myself now.

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